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The Hawaii Geographic Information Coordinating Council (HIGICC) is a private non-profit organization consisting of members of Hawai'i's geospatial community. Our goal is to provide coordination of geospatial activities among a wide range of users in order to avoid duplication of effort, promote data sharing, and maintain data standards throughout the state. 

                           

Upcoming events

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HIGICC provides opportunities to network with other GIS professionals in Hawaii and the Pacific.

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 Donations can be directed towards the Mark Lierman Scholarship, GIS Day activities, or the HIGICC general fund.

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News & Announcements

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  • 20 Sep 2019 9:00 AM | Christine Chaplin (Administrator)

    The third and final informational meeting will be held on Friday, September 20 from 9-11AM in Building 303 in Diamond Head Crater.  

    The Hawaii Coastal Zone Management program (CZM) initiated a project to generate high-resolution Tsunami Design Zone (TDZ) maps for the Island of O'ahu. The project, identified as a priority in the State Multi-Hazard Mitigation Plan and incorporated into the CZM’s 5-Year Coastal Hazard’s Strategy, will replace the low-resolution TDZ maps currently in the ASCE 7-16 standard so that future tsunami design on O'ahu will have the benefit of more accurate and informative mapping products. This third and final Project Information Meeting will provide an overview of the project and review the final mapping products prepared for the entire coastline of O`ahu.

    Oahu Tsunami Mapping Meeting 3 Flyer.pdf

    RSVP: Please email Ian Robertson at ianrob@gmail.com if you are interested in attending.

    Seating is limited and will be assigned on a first-come-first-served basis.


  • 26 Aug 2019 9:00 AM | Christine Chaplin (Administrator)

    This is the third and final technical meeting for the CZM Project to develop high-resolution Tsunami Design Zone Maps for Oahu.

    About this Event

    The Hawaii Coastal Zone Management program (CZM) is about to complete a project to generate high-resolution Tsunami Design Zone (TDZ) maps for the Island of O'ahu. The project outcomes will replace the low-resolution TDZ maps currently in the ASCE 7-16 standard so that future tsunami design of buildings and other structures on O'ahu will have the benefit of more accurate and informative mapping products. This third and final Project Technical Meeting will present the final mapping products being prepared for the entire coastline of O'ahu.

    The meeting will be held in HiEMA Building 303 in Diamond Head Crater, but will also be available online for those who cannot attend in person. Please accept this invitation whether you are attending in person or online.

    This meeting is by invitation only, but if there is someone else whom you think should attend, please forward their name to Ian Robertson at ianrob@gmail.com .

    Directions to HiEMA Building 303 are provide below.

    To join the meeting online from your computer, tablet or smartphone, go to:

    https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/657040685

    You can also dial in using your phone.

    United States: +1 (571) 317-3122

    Access Code: 657-040-685

    If you are new to GoToMeeting, get the app now and be ready when the meeting starts:

    https://global.gotomeeting.com/install/657040685

    This meeting is organized by Ian Robertson, Ph.D., for the State of Hawai'i Office of Planning, Coastal Zone Management Program using Federal funds under Award No. NA16NOS4190093, Award No. NA16NOS4190152, and Award No. NA17NOS4190102 from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), U.S. Department of Commerce. The material presented at this meeting does not necessarily reflect the views of NOAA or the U.S. Department of Commerce.

    Please email Ian Robertson at ianrob@gmail.com with any questions about this event, or if you would like an invitation sent to someone else who should attend the event.

    You can RSVP here:

    https://www.eventbrite.com/e/oahu-high-resolution-tsunami-design-zone-mapping-final-technical-meeting-tickets-68400861819?ref=eattnewsrecs&utm_source=eventbrite&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=newsletter&utm_content=EBrecommend&utm_term=eventcard&afu=5114856107&rank=2&aff=eattnewsrecs
  • 15 Aug 2019 1:21 PM | Christine Chaplin (Administrator)

    HONOLULU – The Department of Business, Economic Development and Tourism (DBEDT) today released the 2018 edition of the “State of Hawaii Data Book.”

    The book is in electronic form and is available on the DBEDT website at: dbedt.hawaii.gov/economic/databook/. The data may be downloaded in whole or in part as either PDF or Excel files.   

    The Hawaii State Data Book is the most comprehensive statistical book about Hawaii in a single compilation. Classified into 24 sections with more than 800 data tables, it covers a broad range of information in areas such as population, education, environment, economics, energy, business enterprises, government, tourism, and transportation.

    “The Data Book is valuable for anyone who wants to open a business in Hawaii or just wants to know general information about the state,” said DBEDT Director Mike McCartney. “DBEDT researchers have been collecting and compiling the data more than 50 years. The information in the book will help us understand where we came from, identify and track trends and assist us in planning for the future.”

    “We update the data book year-round when data becomes available then compile the information around mid-August every year.  Due to the size limit of the book, we did not include all the available historical data in many of the tables.  For those who are interested in historical time-series data in the book, we have extracted and extended those tables with historical data and put them in a separate product called the Data Book Time Series, which can be found on the DBEDT website.  Location of the website is provided at the end of this press release,” said State Economist Dr. Eugene Tian. 

    Interesting data in this newest edition:

    ·          In 2018, the U.S. Postal Service delivered 527 million pieces of mail in Hawaii, 10 million pieces or 1.9 percent less than it delivered in 2017. (Table 16.05)

    ·          According to the Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources, Division of Forestry and Wildlife, 30,593 acres of forest and brushland were burned by 13 fires in 2018. (Table 20.03)

    ·          In 2018, 6.9 percent of the employed in Hawaii were multiple jobholders, showing an increase from 6.5 percent in 2017.  By comparison, 5.0 percent of the employed in the United States were multiple jobholders in 2018. Hawaii’s rank among the 50 states and the District of Columbia, where one is the highest percentage of multiple jobholders, rose from 14 in 2017 to 10 in 2018.  (Table 12.24)

    ·          Since the SAT was redesigned in 2016, Hawaii’s average scores have been higher than U.S. averages.  In 2018, the average SAT score in Hawaii was 1099 (out of 1600).  The average SAT score for the U.S. was 1067. (Table 3.21)

    ·          In March 2018, education, as a share of state & local employment (full-time and part-time), measured at 56.1 percent while its share of total payroll was 47.4 percent. Counting state government only, education was 71.1 percent of total state government employment and 63.7 percent of state government payroll. (Table 9.64)

    ·          The median age for Hawaii’s residents was 39.2 in July 2018.  There were 66 dependent people (defined as persons under 18 years and persons 65 years and over) for every 100 working-age people (defined as persons between the ages of 18 and 64 years old). (Table 1.30)

    DBEDT’s Research and Economic Analysis Division (READ) also maintains the time series of tables and updates the data continuously throughout the year. The time series and the update can also be found on the DBEDT website at http://dbedt.hawaii.gov/economic/databook/.

  • 14 Aug 2019 4:33 PM | Christine Chaplin (Administrator)

    Thank you MAGIS for holding this great event!

    Photo Credit: Gwen Sinclair

  • 20 Jul 2019 8:30 AM | Christine Chaplin (Administrator)

    Hawaii Land Surveyors Association is offering a workshop for Hawaii Description Writing  at the Impact Hub Hawaii.  Please RSVP to hlsa-hawaii@outlook.com by July 13.

  • 08 May 2019 8:50 PM | Christine Chaplin (Administrator)

    The Hawaii Coastal Zone Management program (CZM) has initiated a project to generate high-resolution Tsunami Design Zone (TDZ) maps for the Island of O'ahu. Mapping products have been generated for Honolulu Urban Core and Haleiwa. An informational meeting is to be held on Friday, May 17, from 8:00 am to 12:00 noon in Building 303 in Diamond Head Crater.  Please RSVP to  ianrob@gmail.com if you plan to attend.  

    Additional details available here: Oahu Tsunami Mapping Informational Meeting.pdf

    There is also a webinar available.  To join the meeting from your computer, tablet or smartphonehttps://global.gotomeeting.com/join/611369629

    You can also dial in using your phone. United States: +1 (786) 535-3211 Access Code: 611-369-629 


  • 22 Apr 2019 11:57 AM | Christine Chaplin (Administrator)

    Are you a student using geospatial technologies to further your studies? HIGICC is pleased to announce that we are now accepting applications for the 2019 Mark Lierman Memorial Scholarship. This $1,000 scholarship is awarded annually to a current college student who has demonstrated an appreciation for and understanding of geospatial data and GIS. The applicant must be enrolled at an accredited college or university and either be attending in Hawaii or have graduated from a high school in Hawaii.

    Last year’s recipient, Eszter Collier, a graduate student at UH Hilo, applied her scholarship to her research in mapping biological soil crusts with very high resolution imagery.

    The scholarship application deadline is June 14, 2019. Visit the HIGICC website at www.higicc.org/awards for more information!


  • 03 Aug 2018 6:33 AM | Craig Clouet (Administrator)

    King Tide Photo Surveys next week!
    Aug. 9th and 10th, 2018
    New and improved photo submission platform!
    pacioos.org/kt

    King Tide Photo Surveys are next week!

    Join our amazing team of citizen scientists in the Hawai’i and Pacific Islands King Tides Project and help us document the impacts of King Tides (the highest high tides of the year). These elevated water levels provide a glimpse into the future of what our shorelines may look like on a more regular basis with rising sea levels.

    Visit the project website, www.PacificIslandsKingTides.org, for peak high tide times at locations across the Hawaiian Islands (Aug. 9th and 10th, 2018). 


    We are 
    excited to announce the launch of our new more used friendly photo submission platform! This platform developed in collaboration with the Pacific Islands Ocean Observing System (PacIOOS) allows for faster and more streamlined submission of King Tides photos and observations.

    Thank you for your participation! Your photographs are a valuable resource for helping scientists and decision makers better understand and prepare for sea-level rise.

    Last year with your help our free and publicly accessible database reached a total of 2,400 photos. Help us reach our goal of 3,000 photos this summer!

    Questions?
    Contact: KingTide@hawaii.edu


  • 24 May 2018 7:31 AM | Craig Clouet (Administrator)

    You're invited to join us at the HIGICC O'ahu Geospatial Expo at the Hawaii State Capitol.  There will be presentations from local, county, state and federal GIS professionals.

    The Expo starts at 8:45AM and goes to 3PM.  Event is free! Attendees can go downtown and enjoy a wide variety of lunch options.

  • 16 May 2018 2:25 PM | Craig Clouet (Administrator)

    For those who attended the recent US Census presentation

    "Taming the census TIGER"

    here are links to the presentation and supporting documents.

    Presentation Link:

    American Fact Finder:

    SBE Flyer:

    Local Employment Dynamics:

    Thanks to the Census Data Specialist Eric Coyle. His expertise and presentation skills were greatly appreciated.


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